Your essay should be at least 7 pages long, plus a Works Cited page. It  should

Your essay should be at least 7 pages long, plus a Works Cited page. It  should be an argumentative essay in which you present your interpretation of some aspect of one or more works of poetry, fiction, or drama and try to convince the reader that your interpretation is correct. The essay should include research from at least five secondary sources, at least three of which should be obtained through the BCC library. Citations should follow the MLA style guidelines. Make sure that your essay is virtually free of mechanical or grammatical errors before you submit it.
A main focus of this course is the Research Essay. The Research Essay should focus on one or more poems, short stories, plays, or other literary works. You may use one (or even both) of your 3-page essays as the basis of your Research Essay by, essentially, adding research, primarily into what literary critics and scholars have had to say about the work(s) you have chosen. The Research Essay must meet three important criteria:
1) the essay must be argumentative, centered on the work(s) you have chosen;
2) the essay must be overwhelmingly original: that is, it mainly reflects your ideas, analysis, thoughts, feelings, or understanding of the literary work(s) being written about;
3) the essay must involve research to back up or inform your ideas, analysis, etc., properly cited; and should incorporate research from a minimum of five sources, three of which should be come from  the BCC library’s databases.
Atwood, “Happy Endings”; Kincaid, “Girl”; Cheever, “Reunion”; Bambara, “The Lesson”; Tan, “Two Kinds” (supplemental)
Poetry
Blake, “The Lamb”; Blake, “The Tyger”; Issa, “All the time I pray to Buddha”; Issa, “Don’t worry, spiders”; Lockwood, “Rape Joke”; Stafford, “Traveling through the Dark”; Robinson, “Richard Cory”; Cullen, “Incident”; Brooks, “We Real Cool”; Plath, “Mirror” (supplemental); Roethke, “My Papa’s Waltz”; Heaney, “Digging”
WEEK THREE
Responses 1-3 due
Fiction
Anderson, “Hands”; Carver, “Cathedral”; Ellison, “Battle Royal”
Poetry
Milton, “When I Consider How My Light is Spent”; Dickinson, “Much Madness is divinest Sense”; De la Paz, Autism Screening Questionnaire—Speech and Language Delay”; Wright, “Lying in a Hammock at William Duffy’s Farm in Pine Island, Minnesota”; Whitman, “When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer”; Hughes, “The Negro Speaks of Rivers”; Hughes, “The Weary Blues”; Hughes, “Theme for English B”; Hughes, “Harlem”; Wheatly, “On Being Brought from Africa to America”; Dunbar, “We Wear the Mask”; Hayes, “Talk”; Randall, “Ballad of Birmingham”; Hayden, “Middle Passage”
WEEK FOUR
Responses 4-6 due
Fiction
Chopin, “The Story of an Hour”; Gilman, “The Yellow Wallpaper”; Glaspell, “Trifles”
Poetry
Marlowe, “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love”; Raleigh, “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd”; Shakespeare, Sonnet 18 “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”; Shakespeare, Sonnet 73 “That time of year thou mayest in be behold”; Shakespeare, Sonnet 116 “Let me not to the marriage of true minds”; Herrick, “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time”
Marvel, “To His Coy Mistress”; Millay, “What lips my lips have kissed”; Arnold, “Dover Beach”; Browning, “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways”
WEEK FIVE
Responses 7-9 due
Fiction
Erdrich, “The Red Convertible”; O’Brien, “The Things They Carried”; O’Connor, “A Good Man is Hard to Find”
Poetry
Owen, “Dulce et Decorum Est”; Jarrell, “The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner”; Turner, “What Every Soldier Should Know”; Majmudar, “Arms and the Man”; Crane, “War is Kind” (supplemental)
WEEK SIX
1st 3-page essay due
Fiction
Grimm Brothers, “Aschenputtel” (supplemental); Marquez, “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings”; Marquez, “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World” (supplemental)
Poetry
Sexton, “Cinderella”; Yeats, “The Second Coming”; Carroll, “Jabberwocky”; Coleridge, “Kubla Kahn”
WEEK SEVEN
Fiction
Poe, “The Cask of Amontillado”; Oates, “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”; Jackson, “The Lottery”; Hawthorne, “Young Goodman Brown”
Poetry
Poe, “Annabel Lee”; Browne, “Black Girl Magic”; Keats, “When I have fears that I may cease to be”; Housman, “To an Athlete Dying Young”; Heaney, “Mid-Term Break”; Thomas, “Do not go gentle into that good night”; Dickinson, “Because I could not stop for Death”; Donne, “Death, be not proud”; Hopkins, “Spring and Fall: To a Young Child” (supplemental)
WEEK EIGHT
Plays
Ibsen, A Doll’s House; Nottage, Sweat
Poetry
McKay, “America”; E.E. Cummings, “next to of course god America I”; Corral, “In Colorado My Father Scoured and Stacked Dishes”; Fish, “Collective Nouns for Humans in the Wild”; Darwish, “Identity Card”; Komunyakaa, “Facing it”; Nye, “Gate A-4”; Smith, “Good Bones”
Levine, “What Work Is”; Mali, “What Teachers Make”; Joseph, “On Being Told I Don’t Speak Like a Black Person”; Olzmann, “Letter Beginning with Two Lines by Czeslaw Milosz”
Placed: 9 Dec 2021, 00:07
write an argumentative essay in which you present your interpretation of some aspect of the work(s) you have chosen and try to convince the reader that your interpretation is correct, using mainly the text of the work(s) as evidence.
Poe, “The Cask of Amontillado”; Oates, “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”; Jackson, “The Lottery”; Hawthorne, “Young Goodman Brown”
Poetry
Poe, “Annabel Lee”; Browne, “Black Girl Magic”; Keats, “When I have fears that I may cease to be”; Housman, “To an Athlete Dying Young”; Heaney, “Mid-Term Break”; Thomas, “Do not go gentle into that good night”; Dickinson, “Because I could not stop for Death”; Donne, “Death, be not proud”; Hopkins, “Spring and Fall: To a Young Child” (supplemental)

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