Foreign Policy Annotated Bibliography

 The annotated bibliography is a research tool. It starts with the general idea that it’s good to keep a running list of your research materials and their accompanying citations for your paper or research.  Which means, the first step of an annotated bibliography looks just like a reference page (although it may look differently in different doc styles). Here’s a few articles from a sample paper in our class: 

Berger, D., Hart, C., Jacob, B., & Loeb, S. (2016). Can technology help promote equality of 

educational opportunities? Journal of the Social Sciences, 2(5), 242-271. Retrieved from 

https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7758/rsf.2016.2.5.12

Bewick, C. J., & Kostelnik, M. (2004). Educating early childhood teachers about computers. 

National Association for the Education of Young Children, 59(3),26-29.Retrieved from 

https://www.jstor.org/stable/i40102722

Bowers, S. W., & Ernst, J.V. (2018). Assessing elementary in-service teachers’ stem-centric 

lesson plans. Journal of STEM Education, 19(2), 5-12. Retrieved from 

https://search.proquest.com/docview/2057942401?accountid=35715

Braak, J. V., Hermans, R., & Vanderlinde, R. (2009). Educational technology on a turning point: 

Curriculum implementation in Flanders and challenges for schools. Educational Technology Research and Development, 57(4), 573-584. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/40388648

The above articles would be your list of articles you are keeping for your research (probably ongoing) that you may (or may not) decide on using in your final paper for the class.  What the annotated bibliography does next is try to help you save time.  Instead of having to reread all those articles again 4 or 6 weeks from now (to put them in your paper), you add notes (annotations) into the citation list (bibliography) to refer back to later.  Some professors only assign a summative annotated bibliography.  That’s where you write a summary after each citation entry and would be formatted like this: 

Berger, D., Hart, C., Jacob, B., & Loeb, S. (2016). Can technology help promote equality of 

educational opportunities?Journal of the Social Sciences, 2(5), 242-271. Retrieved from 

https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7758/rsf.2016.2.5.12

[ADD SUMMARY PARAGRAPH OF THE ABOVE ARTICLE HERE.]

Bewick, C. J., & Kostelnik, M. (2004). Educating early childhood teachers about computers. 

National Association for the Education of Young Children, 59(3),26-29.Retrieved from 

https://www.jstor.org/stable/i40102722

[ADD SUMMARY PARAGRAPH OF THE ABOVE ARTICLE HERE.]

Bowers, S. W., & Ernst, J.V. (2018). Assessing elementary in-service teachers’ stem-centric 

lesson plans. Journal of STEM Education, 19(2), 5-12. Retrieved from 

https://search.proquest.com/docview/2057942401?accountid=35715

[ADD SUMMARY PARAGRAPH OF THE ABOVE ARTICLE HERE.]

Braak, J. V., Hermans, R., & Vanderlinde, R. (2009). Educational technology on a turning point: 

Curriculum implementation in Flanders and challenges for schools. Educational Technology Research and Development, 57(4), 573-584. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/40388648

[ADD SUMMARY PARAGRAPH OF THE ABOVE ARTICLE HERE.]

Other professors assign an analytical (analysis) annotated bibliography.  That’s where you write your analysis (there might be a specific type of analysis assigned or you might be free to do your own analysis type) after each citation entry and would be formatted in the same manner as above, but you’d substitute an analysis for each summary.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  YOU HAVE TO DO BOTH PARAGRAPHS (SUMMARY AND ANALYSIS) FOR OUR ASSIGNMENT!  MAKE SURE TO TAKE A LOOK AT THE SAMPLE TO SEE PROPER FORMAT OF THE ASSIGNMENT BUT REMEMBER TO FORMAT THE CITATIONS IN YOUR OWN DOCUMENTATION STYLE!

A few other points/tips to consider:

  • I’ve shared a slide presentation of a theory called “The Modes of Discourse.” You’ll need to look through it carefully and understand it:

    • Your summaries have to be in expository mode (the mode is explained in the slide presentation). 

    • Your analyses can be in any mode other than the literary mode (the mode is explained in the slide presentation). 

  • Most of you know what you want your final paper in this class to focus on.  As such, these articles should be aimed at that goal and on that focus.    

  • Some of you DO NOT know what you want your final paper in this class to focus on.  If so, these articles should be aimed at helping you find a focus.  That means you should research complex issues/problems in your field for this assignment to help you choose a direction to move forward. 

  • These must be academic articles.  That means they have to meet these three criteria: 

    • They can’t be anonymous.  Anonymous isn’t academic.  They can’t be the name of a company or group.  It has to be a named person or multiple people. 

    • It must use sources in some manner.  Footnotes?  That’s fine.  Quotes?  That’s fine. Paraphrase? That’s fine. Endnotes? That’s fine.

    • It has to have been published in an academic journal.  

  • For most of you, the journal it was published in goes in the citation.  You can see the journals in the above samples because the journal names are italicized in that documentation style. 

In the past, students who have done poorly on the annotated bibliographies have often fell into some of these holes: 

  • They didn’t use academic articles for this assignment.  Instead, they used other types of articles. 

    • Wait… What if I can’t find the author’s name? Don’t use that article. 

    • Wait… What if they didn’t use sources? Don’t use that article. 

    • Wait… What if I don’t know if it’s in an academic journal? Don’t use that article. 

  • They didn’t get the citation format correct for their documentation style.  

  • They didn’t meet the word count for each paragraph.  What? Word count? Yes. Be awesome. Exceed the minimum.  

  • They ignored the mode requirement introduced this week.  It’s important. 

What would I do if I had to do this assignment?  

  • I’d double-check the assignment prompt and any other materials (e.g. handouts, emails, samples, etc.) to make sure of all the requirements before starting the annotated bibs.  

  • I’d make sure to ask my professor questions for clarity when needed. That way, when I submitted my work, I’d already be confident that I understood the assignment and was on my way to earning full credit.  

  • I’d make sure I knew the 3 requirements of academic articles shared above so I didn’t accidentally do work and not get credit for it. 

  • I’d double check my citation format and look for variations (mistakes) between my citations. (See below for an example of variation errors.)  

  • I’d check my word count on each paragraph and make sure to go past the minimum.

  • I’d make sure my summaries were written in the expository mode from the theory presentation.  

IMPORTANT NOTE:  Many students, roughly 75%, end up with variation errors that cost them points on each assignment requiring documentation style use moving forward.  A variation error happens when you are supposed to follow one correct template for formatting your citations and instead, make little variations.  Below, the first entry is formatted in the required manner of the student’s documentation style (remember, your doc style may be different from her doc style).  I’ve put variation errors in the entries after it (highlighted in red). You’ll see it looks almost correct… but has 12 errors.  That level of attention to detail won’t score well.  Remember to follow the required format of your documentation style flawlessly.

Berger, D., Hart, C., Jacob, B., & Loeb, S. (2016). Can technology help promote equality of 

educational opportunities? Journal of the Social Sciences, 2(5), 242-271. Retrieved from 

https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7758/rsf.2016.2.5.12

Bewick, Cecil & Kostelnik, M. (2004). Educating Early Childhood Teachers About Computers. 

National Association for the Education of Young Children, 59(3),26-29.Retrieved from 

https://www.jstor.org/stable/i40102722

Bowers, S. W., & Ernst, J.V. 2018 Assessing elementary in-service teachers’ stem-centric 

lesson plans. Journal of STEM Education, 19(2), 5-12. Retrieved from 

https://search.proquest.com/docview/2057942401?accountid=35715

Jim Braak, (2009). Educational technology on a turning point: Curriculum implementation in 

Flanders and challenges for schools. Educational Technology Research and Development, 

57.4, 573-584. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/40388648

An Annotated Bibliography is a list of citations (e.g. a Works Cited page, a Bibliography, etc) but after each citation you share a summary paragraph followed by an analysis paragraph. One purpose of these paragraphs is to remind researchers and readers of the relevance, accuracy, quality, etc. of the articles. Another purpose is to help researchers (like yourself) keep track of the many sources you are engaging with during your research. For this assignment find five academic articles (make sure you know the three requirements for the academic label) from the Mid library database that focus on a problem/issue in your field or a closely related field and create a detailed Annotated Bibliography. Present the citations in the documentation style of your field (from your first assignment). Putting in strong effort here means there is potential for you to use these paragraphs in your final Researched Position Paper later in the semester. Both your summary and analysis paragraph should reach 200 words minimum each to avoid deduction. Worth 100 points. (Intellectual Skills: 2, 3; Broad and Integrative Knowledge: 1, 3)

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