Category Archives: MLA

Race and Racism

I recommend a minimum of 1 pages (double spaced) in answer to each question (#1 and #2). The best answers do not simply repeat what the text says but provide detailed interpretations of the text and analysis of the author’s arguments (i.e., analysis of the argument forms, and evaluation of its arguments). You are required to answer all the questions below. If you would like to meet with me to discuss your paper, please see me during my office hours. The 1st paper is also governed by the University’s plagiarism policy. See the syllabus concerning this policy. All students must submit their paper to this link. When you are using our assigned reading, you may consider an “in text” citation as sufficient (i.e., giving credit to the author by name in your summaries, direct quotes, and paraphrases). You may use outside sources (websites, articles, books, etc.) to interpret the authors’ texts, but I am interested in seeing your own interpretation of the texts. So simply substituting someone else’s interpretation for your own is highly discouraged. So it is best to use primarily the assigned reading (as well as any notes from lectures), your own reading comprehension skills and documentaries (in the Videos section of Canvas) when it comes to interpreting the text. (The editors’ preface/ introduction to The Idea of Race is also useful for understanding the essays in that book.) I am looking for your own interpretation here. Keeping this recommendation in mind, if you want to use secondary sources for statistics, to provide evidence for your own arguments or even to assist you in interpreting the text, you may do so, but these sources must be properly cited using any style guide (e.g., Turabian or MLA). (See the “Paper Assignments” in the Modules section for links to Turabian and MLA style guide(s).) Failure to do so violates the University’s policy on plagiarism. Papers should be double spaced and use 12 point font.
Answer all of the following questions (50 points each for 1 and 2):
Select a theorist from the sections on early “racist science” (e.g., Bernier, from The Idea of Race) and explain the following: (BERNIER IS ATTATCHED IN FILE)
1A) What is the main thesis of the theory? What evidence does the author provide to support this thesis? What are the unscientific elements of this theory? Why do you find them to be unscientific? Explain your answer? Do you find any racist elements in this theory? What specifically are the racist elements or claims of this theory? Why do you consider them racist? Explain your answer. Be sure you provide reasons and explanations to support why you take the author’s theory to be unscientific and racist. You should include some reference to Franz Boas and/or modern genetics to demonstrate what exactly is unscientific about “racist science.” (For critiques of scientific racism, see readings for Module 5; for modern genetics, you may refer to the any on-line documentaries posted in Canvas on the subject.) You should also, at minimum, offer a clear definition of what you understand “racist” to mean and a clear explanation of how the theory fits or does not fit this definition.
1B) Based upon and demonstrating your knowledge of the assigned reading (including Blum and Anderson) and documentaries, explain how this racist science had a historical and political influence (domestic and international) in the 19th and/or 20th Your answer should clearly identify and explain why these historical/political developments are racist.(For direct political influence of racist science, see readings for Module 3, Module 4 and Module 6.)
2A) Based upon your knowledge of the assigned reading (Blum’s book, Omi’s and Winant’s essay in The Idea of Race), explain in detail the theory of racial formation as well as the idea of racialization. Be sure to describe the different levels of the process of racial formation and provide examples of each level. Drawing on your knowledge of the assigned reading (e.g. Anderson or Rattansi) and/or the documentaries (esp. Race: the Power of an Illusion), explain what role governments have in these processes and conditions (e.g. segregation). (See readings for Module 3, Module 4 and Module 6.)
B) What is the theory of “racial constructivism” as described by Blum in his summary of the social construction of race? Demonstrating your knowledge of the readings, what arguments support the main thesis of this theory? (See the assigned reading for Blum in Module 6.)
C) Do you agree or disagree with our authors’ assessments of this theory? Why or why not? Explain your answer.

Reflection Essay over the course

Write a Reflection over the Education 1301 Course. This course is for students who are wanting to become teachers. We have learned about philosophies of education, we learned about perks and cons of becoming teachers, we did classroom observations in real classrooms and kind of learned what the live classroom looks and feels like. These are some of the things you can mention in the essay and you can also research things that we would learn in Educ 1301 class to incorporate into the essay. Please make sure this is a great reflection that looks and sounds like it is from me. My teacher should not be able to tell that someone else wrote this. It should sound like it is coming from the heart. 

literature review

For this assignment I will paste the instructions below. I will provide you with the question which you are answering about the short stories which i will aslo give you to read. 5 Pages. this is what you will be writing about based on the stories!: 

  1. Speculative fiction is said to have "the ability to immerse a reader in a world that is entirely different than their own with an exciting set of possibilities, unique characters, and different rules." Choosing at least one story from each genre (Science Fiction, Fantasy, Magical Realism) discuss how these stories accomplish this. Which genre does a better job with this and why?  See the lecture on imagery for help with this!
  1. Your introduction paragraph should
    • Introduce /explain the genres we covered this semester (just the major ones–fantasy, scifi, magical realism. No need to get into all the subgenres of these)
    • Introduce the stories you plan to discuss (if you have 4+ you may choose to introduce them in the body paragraphs)
    • Provide a thesis statement based on your answer to one of the provided essay questions
  2. Body paragraphs should focus on your claim regarding the the text(s), NOT a summary of the texts
    • Use the following structure to keep body paragraphs organized
      • Claim: What point are you trying to make?
      • Evidence: Provide quotes from the stories to "prove" this point
      • Explanation: Be sure to explain the significance of the quotes
  3. Your conclusion paragraph should
    • Summarize your main points
    • Provide final reflections on the essay question

4. You do not need a works cited page, as I have access to all the stories and their full citations

5. Your essay must be a minimum of 5 pgs. in length

As discussed in our lesson on literary criticism, a single text allows for multiple interpretations. There is no one theory, perspective, or ‘truth’ about literature that is read by many—what matters in determining the validity of an interpretation is how a writer supports their answer. This final essay will allow you to apply what you’ve learned about literary criticism by examining and interpreting elements from stories in all three genres of speculative fiction: Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Magical Realism.

For this assignment, you’ll need to chose one of the questions below and answer it in a 5-page essay. Think of this like a longer version of what you’ve already been doing for each of your Sunday Reading Responses! For whichever question you choose, you should reference at least:

  • one science fiction story
  • one fantasy story
  • one magical realism story 
  • (you can absolutely use more!)

 

Fate, freedom, free will, and/or determinism in Homer or Hesiod

Texts may include the TheogonyIliad, and/or Odyssey, and topics can include the ethical, logical, political, metaphysical, religious, or other philosophical dimensions of these writings. 

 MUST:

  • Contain a thesis in the opening paragraph
  • Show what view/analysis/interpretation your thesis is opposed to
  • Use textual evidence to support said thesis
  • Use 3-5 secondary sources (peer-reviewed journal articles, books, etc.) [your count is not to include Wikipedia]
  • Be edited: if I find five or more typos or grammatical errors in your paper, expect to rewrite it

histories of Guatemala, Mexico, and Cuba

Using the resources given to you, write about the histories of Guatemala, Mexico, and Cuba and then describe the 

actions taken by the United States in those countries. I want THREE separate paragraphs for 

Guatemala, Mexico, and Cuba. I sent you a pdf reading and watch this youtube video

 ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gW84cAN2Pw ) to help you write the histories of Guatemala, Mexico, and Cuba and actions taken by the United States in those countries. PLEASE only use those two resources I gave you. 


Stop Asian Hate movement

My chosen movement is: Stop Asian Hate movement


I want it written in a well-structured Essay Format. Please incorporate some ideas from the three provided sources, and draw up outside sources from other scholarly and credible sources. 

Using a combination of core class concepts/frameworks and outside sources, detail and assess your chosen social movement or revolution. The narrative of your paper should take a position on the movement or revolution under study and, in one way or another, address the following questions:

  • What was the context (the political and social forces, material conditions, etc.) under which your movement or revolution emerged? Was there a specific problem or tension that led to mobilization? Was your movement or revolution a continuation of a longer-standing struggle, or did it arise to address a new situation or threat specific to its time? 
  • What are the central claims or demands of your chosen movement or revolution? What motivates them? Do they adhere to or espouse a particular ideological position or vision of society? To whom and/or against what were these claims or demands directed. On whose behalf?
  • Who were the principal actors, and what were the leading organizations, parties, governments, etc.? 
  • What role did class or identity play, if any, in terms of what drove the movement or revolution, as well as its internal dynamics, composition, and potential conflicts?
  • What were some of the strategies and tactics used to galvanize support, articulate the movement or revolution’s claims and demands, and ultimately attempt to achieve victory?
  • How did the general public view your movement or revolution? What was the role of the press, if any? 
  • Was violence and/or violent repression a factor, and if so, how was it used, and how was it justified?
  • Did your movement or revolution achieve some or all of its stated goals? Why or why not? What part did leadership play in its success and/or failures?
  • Ultimately, should your movement or revolution be considered successful? On what grounds?  

Discussion 2 : Minimum Wage

The federal minimum wage is currently $7.25 an hour.  That means that covered workers nationwide must receive $7.25 an hour.  The law allows states and localities to have a higher minimum wage and some places have done just that, increasing their minimum wage to $9 an hour or even an eventual $15 an hour.  Is this a good idea?  Do you think Texas should have a higher minimum wage?  What, if any, minimum wage do you favor?  What is the reasoning behind your position?  


Before responding to this question, read the essays and watch the videos posted below

Here is an article that shows what states have raised the minimum wage and states that have not. 

https://www.epi.org/minimum-wage-tracker/#/min_wage/Michigan (Links to an external site.)


Video: PBS News Hour, “What Quality of Life Can Minimum Wage Workers Afford.”

 

What quality of life can minimum wage workers afford? (Links to an external site.)


NPR, “When Does a Minimum Wage Become Too High?”

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2019/04/23/716126740/when-does-a-minimum-wage-become-too-high

Economists Argue about the Minimum Wage

 

https://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21724802-two-studies-their-impact-seattle-reach-opposite-conclusions-economists-argue

Deontology ethics

Journal Reflection #1

  1. Do you believe that there are universal moral laws, i.e. that right and wrong are questions independent of particular circumstances at a given moment? (150 words, 10 points)

 

Journal Reflection #2

  1. Do you think what is true for you is true for everyone? (150 words; 10 pts)

 

Journal Reflection #3

  1. What do you think? Is right and wrong universally true, regardless of circumstances? Or, are there acceptable exceptions? (150 words: 10 pts)

Black Lives matter (2)

My chosen movement is: Black Lives matter


I want it written in a well-structured Essay Format. Please incorporate some ideas from the three provided sources, and draw up outside sources from other scholarly and credible sources. 

Using a combination of core class concepts/frameworks and outside sources, detail and assess your chosen social movement or revolution. The narrative of your paper should take a position on the movement or revolution under study and, in one way or another, address the following questions:

  • What was the context (the political and social forces, material conditions, etc.) under which your movement or revolution emerged? Was there a specific problem or tension that led to mobilization? Was your movement or revolution a continuation of a longer-standing struggle, or did it arise to address a new situation or threat specific to its time? 
  • What are the central claims or demands of your chosen movement or revolution? What motivates them? Do they adhere to or espouse a particular ideological position or vision of society? To whom and/or against what were these claims or demands directed. On whose behalf?
  • Who were the principal actors, and what were the leading organizations, parties, governments, etc.? 
  • What role did class or identity play, if any, in terms of what drove the movement or revolution, as well as its internal dynamics, composition, and potential conflicts?
  • What were some of the strategies and tactics used to galvanize support, articulate the movement or revolution’s claims and demands, and ultimately attempt to achieve victory?
  • How did the general public view your movement or revolution? What was the role of the press, if any? 
  • Was violence and/or violent repression a factor, and if so, how was it used, and how was it justified?
  • Did your movement or revolution achieve some or all of its stated goals? Why or why not? What part did leadership play in its success and/or failures?
  • Ultimately, should your movement or revolution be considered successful? On what grounds?  

Black Lives matter

My chosen movement is: Black Lives matter


I want it written in a well-structured Essay Format. Please incorporate some ideas from the three provided sources, and draw up outside sources from other scholarly and credible sources. 

Using a combination of core class concepts/frameworks and outside sources, detail and assess your chosen social movement or revolution. The narrative of your paper should take a position on the movement or revolution under study and, in one way or another, address the following questions:

  • What was the context (the political and social forces, material conditions, etc.) under which your movement or revolution emerged? Was there a specific problem or tension that led to mobilization? Was your movement or revolution a continuation of a longer-standing struggle, or did it arise to address a new situation or threat specific to its time? 
  • What are the central claims or demands of your chosen movement or revolution? What motivates them? Do they adhere to or espouse a particular ideological position or vision of society? To whom and/or against what were these claims or demands directed. On whose behalf?
  • Who were the principal actors, and what were the leading organizations, parties, governments, etc.? 
  • What role did class or identity play, if any, in terms of what drove the movement or revolution, as well as its internal dynamics, composition, and potential conflicts?
  • What were some of the strategies and tactics used to galvanize support, articulate the movement or revolution’s claims and demands, and ultimately attempt to achieve victory?
  • How did the general public view your movement or revolution? What was the role of the press, if any? 
  • Was violence and/or violent repression a factor, and if so, how was it used, and how was it justified?
  • Did your movement or revolution achieve some or all of its stated goals? Why or why not? What part did leadership play in its success and/or failures?
  • Ultimately, should your movement or revolution be considered successful? On what grounds?